Comparison of remote desktop software

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Built-in Encryption: the software has at least one method of encrypting the data between the local and remote computers, and the encryption mechanism is built into the remote control software.


Multiple sessions: the ability to connect to a server in many users, and each one see his different desktop


In the table above, the following terminology is intended to be used to describe some important features:


Remote Assistance: href="../index.php" >remote and local users are able to view the same screen at the same time, so remote user can assist a local user.


NAT Passthrough: the ability to connect to the server behind a NAT without configuring the router's port forwarding rules. It offers an advantage when you can't reconfigure the router/firewall (for example in case it is on the Internet service provider's side), but is a serious security risk (unless the traffic is end-to-end encrypted), because all the traffic will pass through some proxy server which in most cases is owned by the remote access application's developers.


File Transfer: the software allows the user to transfer files between the local and remote computers, from within the client software's user interface.


Listening mode: where a server connects to a viewer. The server site does not have to configure its firewall/NAT to allow access on port 5900 (or 5800); the onus is on the viewer, which is useful if the server site has no computer expertise, while the viewer user would be expected to be more knowledgeable.


Screen blanking: the ability to prevent the user of the host/server from viewing what is currently being displayed on the screen while a remote user is connected.


Seamless Window: the software allows an application to be run on the server, and just the application window to be shown on the client's desktop. Normally the remote user interface chrome is also removed, giving the impression that the application is running on the client machines.


Audio Support: the remote control software transfers audio signals across the network and plays the audio through the speakers attached to the local computer. For example, music playback software normally sends audio signals to the locally attached speakers, via some sound controller hardware. If the remote control software package supports audio transfer, the playback software can run on the remote computer, while the music can be heard from the local computer, as though the software were running locally.